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Balkan Mine | Solo Exhibition by Krasimira Butseva

‘‘Containing the past within my body and the visits of these spaces allowed for a connection to be made. Embedding memory and history, which never belonged to me. Diving into foreign and mother lands encapsulated.’’

‘‘Containing the past within my body and the visits of these spaces allowed for a connection to be made. Embedding memory and history, which never belonged to me. Diving into foreign and mother lands encapsulated.’’

Vernissage: 11th July 2019 19:00

On view: 11 - 14 July 2019

RSVP

‘Balkan Mine’ is an extensive research of the shifting layers of history, memory and trauma related to the forced labour camps of the Bulgarian communist regime (1946-89) by photographer and researcher Krasimira Butseva (1994, BG).

In a multimedia installation including film, photography, sculpture and layers of sound, she is recreating her personal journey through the spaces where a dictatorship was once enforced at its hardest. This ongoing project starting in 2016 is Butseva’s collection of accounts of victims and a record of her own subconscious and fragmented experience of history as an outsider. By letting the spectator become part of the intimate narratives of both the survivors and the artist, she is able to construct an image of unseen historical events and formulate a bridge between past and present, thus referencing the unspoken trauma carried within a society and its future generations.

Artist's Bio

Krasimira has an MA & BA degrees in Photography from the University of Portsmouth, she has exhibited her work at Seen Fifteen Gallery, London (2019), Phoenix Gallery, Brighton Photo Fringe (2018), In motion / Prototype, Sofia, Bulgaria (2017), Four Corners Gallery, London (2017), Pingyao International Photography Festival, China (2016) and Uncertain States / Mile End Art Pavilion, London (2016).

Curated by Krasimira Butseva & Maya Hristova

 

The artist will be present at the opening.

The exhibition at EEP Berlin's Gallery will be accompanied by an artist talk and a workshop:

13th July | Saturday 5-6pm | Remembering whilst forgetting, In conversation Krasimira Butseva & Maya Hristova

14th July | Sunday, 4-6pm | Trauma & Ritual, Reading & Writing Group

As part of the workshop Krasimira Butseva will do a series of readings of texts which have influenced her works on show at Balkan mine. From excerpts of fictional stories to history books, artists texts and archival documents, this session will blur the lines between real and imagined allowing for the artist’s narrative to come across. The reading will also be followed by a writing exercise in relation to the themes discussed.

EEP Berlin’s Gallery

Liegnitzer Str. 34 | 10999 Berlin [Kreuzberg]

Wed-Sun 2pm - 6pm

So Close So Far: Photography Installation by Anoring

‘‘The story which comes with a photograph is evolving just as we watch and recognize things and people. We build our subjective perception and rely on that image.’’

Vernissage: 13th June 2019 19:00

Exhibition duration: 13 June - 19 June 2019

RSVP

'So Close So Far' is a 3D photography installation consisting of three parts by Berlin-based-Russian-born visual artist Anoring aka Tatiana Hahn. The piece actively engages the viewer with the human authorities of perception. We look at the world, and yet it for the most part it remains unseen. "An act of perceiving a still picture however, invites the viewer to explore" says Anoring, "The story which comes with a photograph is evolving just as we watch and recognize things and people. We build our subjective perception and rely on that image."

The project 'So Close So Far' is a diptych. The first part, a diorama, invites the viewer to step into a landscape scene with an altered view of the Brooklyn Bridge in NY at its center. The perspective and visual importance of the objects in the scene are manipulated by the artist in order to inverse and generally subvert the typical perception of the metropolitan landscape.

The second part, entitled 'Same Place Another Time' is an interactive projection. Any willing participant will be automatically photographed and placed among the others in an ever evolving group portrait.

An auxiliary part of the project is a book/puzzle of 100 numbered 10x15 cm cards. The viewer is herself invited to recreate the landscape.

Tatiana Hahn was born in 1988 in Moscow, Russia. In 2015 she received a BA in Arts of Photography from the Mossovet College, Moscow and in 2018 graduated from the Ostkreuzschule für Fotografie, Berlin. Hahn was included in various exhibitions including the Festival Young Photography “Presence” in St.Peterburg, Boehmers “Islands” Oranienstrasse in Berlin and “12 Jahrgang Abschlussausstellung”, Ostkreuzschule für Fotografie, Berlin.

Curated by Maya Hristova

 

The artist will be present at the opening.

EEP Berlin’s Gallery

Liegnitzer Str. 34 | 10999 Berlin [Kreuzberg]

Wed-Sun 2pm - 6pm

Marie Tomanova | New York Calling: A Mini Retrospective

‘‘To emigrate is always to dismantle the center of the world, and so to move into a lost, disoriented one of fragments.’’ --John Berger

‘‘To emigrate is always to dismantle the center of the world, and so to move into a lost, disoriented one of fragments.’’ --John Berger

Vernissage: 26th April 2019 19:00 | Young American Book launch during opening

Exhibition duration: 27 April - 17 May 2019

Having graduated with an MFA in painting in the Czech Republic Marie Tomanova moved to the United States in 2011 and began to work through her feelings of displacement living there. By 2014, she rearticulated this idea of displacement into a self-portrait series in which she attempted to see herself in the landscape.

Having grown up on a farm in a small village in south Moravia, she felt that she fit somehow with nature, that it was an essential part of who she is, and that as an immigrant living in the United States, she had grown distant from that physically and emotionally. It is only through this self-portrait work that she started to gain a sense of self-worth as an artist and as a person and began to be able to see herself in the United States and during this time she was also taking the Young American portraits. And in a way, the self-portrait work in nature and the Young American portraits are really very close to the same thing. The self-portrait work is about seeing herself fit in the American landscape and the Young American portraits are also about fitting into the American landscape, but in a social aspect.

As photographer Ryan McGinley writes in his introduction to Tomanova’s debut monograph Young American, “This is a future free of gender binaries and stale old definitions of beauty. In Marie’s world people can just simply be. I wish all of America’s youth culture looked like Marie’s photos of Downtown, diverse and inclusive.”

New York Calling brings together for the first time a wide range of Tomanova’s work including: self-portraiture in nature (2016-ongoing), Young American (2015-ongoing), and Live For the Weather (2005-2010/2017), a series of early images taken while growing up in Mikulov, Czech Republic.

Curated by Thomas Beachdel and Maya Hristova.

 

The artist will be present at the opening.

EEP Berlin’s Gallery

Liegnitzer Str. 34 | 10999 Berlin [Kreuzberg]

Wed-Sun 2pm - 6pm

In Belief Is Power | Solo exhibition by Hristina Tasheva

With my artistic work, I try to establish a position as citizen that opposes the constant attempts of the media and politicians to build and consolidate a negative image of migrants as uncivilized, useless and unproductive people. These clichés are creating a lot of tension in the local population and at the same time, marginalize and objectify the 232 million people that belong to the migrant group.

Being a Bulgarian immigrant in Western Europe, I know how important the welcoming and friendly attitude of the local people is for the newcomers. How great my indignation was when Bulgaria, my home country, the place of origin for two million emigrants, tolerated nationalist groups to hunt down Muslim refugees who were illegally crossing E.U.’s external border with Turkey.

Vernissage: 9th April 2019 18:30

Exhibition duration: 10 - 22 April 2019

‘In Belief is Power’, a project that was developed for the duration of three years and realized in the form of a book at the end of October 2018 with the generous support of the Dutch Mondriaan Fund (Scholarship for Emerging Artists).

The project brings to attention contemporary and historical responses to migration where the life and history of the local population living at the border of Bulgaria and European Union with Turkey is taken as a case study. Asking relevant questions about what provokes the fear of foreigners, what is the Bulgarian identity made up of, how does the border region reflect what is happening across Europe, is a way to provoke a debate, that aims to understand the social and political processes that lead to rising nationalistic sentiments not only in Bulgaria, but also in the whole world right now.

In 2018 'In Belief Is Power' won Full Contact 2018 Award at SCAN Tarragona Festival (Spain); it was shortlisted for Unseen Dummy Award (the Netherlands) and it was exhibited at Photobook Showcase at Singapore International Photography Festival and at Contemporary Space in Varna, Bulgaria. In the beginning of 2019 the book was part of the exhibition Prospects & Concepts at Art Rotterdam and Photo Book Exhibition of FOTO WIEN (Austria).

Born in Bulgaria, Hristina Tasheva (1976, Varna) lives and works in the Netherlands. She has graduated from Gerrit Rietveld Academy (2011) in Amsterdam and has earned her Masters in Photography at AKV | St. Joost (2015), Breda. Her experience as an Eastern European migrant and her position as a citizen are a driving force in her work. As conceptual artist she uses mediums like photography, text, sound and performance. 

 

The artist will be present at the opening.

EEP Berlin’s Gallery

Liegnitzer Str. 34 | 10999 Berlin [Kreuzberg]

Wed-Sun 2pm - 6pm

Somewheres & Anywheres | Group exhibition

We're the only species on earth, which believes in stories, myths and narratives. The ability to believe in stories allowed us to form large and complex societies.

Vernissage: 20 March 2019 19:00

Exhibition duration: 21 March - 7 April 2019

We're the only species on earth, which believes in stories, myths and narratives. The ability to believe in stories allowed us to form large and complex societies.

Societies today seem to be repeatedly looking towards the past for ideas on how to move forward, while many sociologists note that we lack new stories and historical paradigms on which to draw the maps of our future. How does a cultural narrative emerge? How do we choose in what to believe and has this choice become more conscious in this modern day and age?

Fyodor Telkov (RU)

Pavel Borshchenko (UA)

Sasha Chaika (RU)

Yana Kononova (UA)

 

Sasha Chaika and Yana Kononova will be present at the opening.

EEP Berlin’s Gallery

Liegnitzer Str. 34 | 10999 Berlin [Kreuzberg]

Wed-Sun 2pm - 6pm

We came from different worlds | Interview with Zuza Krajewska

'There’s a characteristic sense of self-consciousness when we look at things that are outside of our idealized world of perfection as it has been formulated by the media, where there’s little room for people’s true stories, their bodies, emotions, where showing your true self is often considered a sign of weakness. I like to make the viewer feeling a bit uncomfortable and observing their reaction.'

City of Gardens | Exhibition by Viacheslav Poliakov and Elena Subach

'Something should by all means be hidden, at least one undisclosed secret among the exhibited works, something meaningful to you, something only you would know about.'

‘Something should by all means be hidden, at least one undisclosed secret among the exhibited works, something meaningful to you, something only you would know about.’

Urban legend becomes the starting point for Ukrainian photographers Subach and Poliakov’s exploration of the real and hypothetical spaces of the Polish city of Katowice. Elena says that the fall of the Soviet Union with the following process of post-industrialization, have in her opinion brought about the return of life led by superstition. While in the modern microcosm of the city, Poliakov is interested in the accidental nature of urban transformation and the echoes of global and local influences onto its material surface.

Subach and Poliakov are based in Lviv and the focus of their work lies in the cultural space of Western Ukraine with its unpredictable urban environment, local myths and contemporary utopias. ‘City of Gardens’ is a collaborative project, which takes them to a new place - the modern metropolis and former center of the mining industry in the Polish region of Silesia, Katowice.

Vernissage: 1 March 2019 19:00

The artists will be present.

Exhibition: 2 - 17 March 2019

EEP Berlin’s Gallery

Liegnitzer Str. 34 | 10999 Berlin [Kreuzberg]

Wed-Sun 2pm - 6pm | eepberlin.org

Emerging Talent | Petar Petrov

'I feel very attracted to the idea of memories. My own, other people’s, places that have that 'look' when you feel certain electricity in the air and you know that significant events have taken place there. Even if they are not historically significant, most certainly they are personally significant to someone.'

Listen to the Space | Interview with Alena Zhandarova

'I wouldn’t want my photos to be read superficially, so that the mind would cling to a familiar link and say ‘Okay, now everything is clear.’ I don’t want everything to be clear, I don’t want it to be understandable, because you can understand something only with your mind, and I want the viewer to turn it off and feel.'

Video Installation 'Moscow-NYC' by Naum Medovoy as Part of Skip Intro

We're excited to announce our screening of the video installation 'Moscow - NYC' by artist and filmmaker Naum Medovoy (b. 1937, Odessa), which was presented as part of  his exhibition 'The Last March' last year at the Moscow MOMA.
Naum Medovoy (b. 1937, Odessa) is an artist and documentary filmmaker. He’s perhaps best known for his 1973 film 'The Missing' ('The Last March'), which combines World War II archival photographs and film from the Central Documentary Archive, located near Moscow, with his own 35mm footage to reveal the fate of Soviet soldiers in World War II, captured as prisoners of war. Soviet surrender codes at the time stipulated it was better to die than be held in enemy captivity, thus large swaths of servicemen in camps were deemed missing in action and left to die. When they did return to the USSR, they were considered traitors and sent to Gulag work camps. These men are considered something of a lost generation.

SKIP INTRO - Images preserve traces

The form of a photograph, analog or digital, contains traces of its existence from the moment of its creation. Through these five positions SKIP INTRO attempts to explore different ways in which the multidimensionality of real life experience is being mirrored through the physical form of an image.
The form of a photograph, analog or digital, contains traces of its existence from the moment of its creation. Through the following five positions SKIP INTRO attempts to explore different ways in which the multidimensionality of real life experience is being mirrored through the physical form of an image. How does the photographer’s context become tangible through the choice of a photographic technique? What does an image tell the viewer about the context it was created in or the identity of its photographer? Images preserve traces – residual impressions caused by the presence of an object.

Pershe Veresnya by Gorsad Kiev

Gorsad Kiev are three photographers devoted to exploring the raw identity of today’s Ukrainian youth. 'Pershe Veresnya', 1st of September in Ukrainian, is about the day we go to school. In these analog portraits we see kids, characters from the suburbs of Kiev, often appearing inside undefined interiors and illuminated by a flash. Although unpolitical, these explorations speak subtly of the context they were created in, a European country that has been torn by conflict for years. Gorsad’s is a creative power, which aims at destroying moral untruths through their straight forward explorations of the uninhibited youth of their city. “We are not adults, but not children anymore.”
Gorsad Kiev are three photographers devoted to exploring the raw identity of today’s Ukrainian youth.

Cicha Woda by Piotr Pietrus

Piotr Pietrus is a Polish-born photographer who has lived in many different countries and is now based in Berlin. Guided by a search for ephemeral flashes in our fast-paced life he’s collecting images, that once combined, create their own narrative; a visual atlas of some sort of magic that is quietly moving just below the surface.
Guided by a search for ephemeral flashes in our fast-paced life Piotr Pietrus is collecting images, that once combined, create their own narrative; a visual atlas of some sort of magic that is quietly moving just below the surface.

NA4JOPM8 by Igor Chekachkov

For Igor Chekachkov ‘NA4JOPM8’ is an attempt to accept the destruction of his ten-year archive, both personal and professional, which happened when his hard disk with 250 000 images on it had a malfunction. When it was repaired, all images appeared mixed together, which resulted in new images, all marked by digital artefacts. Unexpectedly, this loss allowed the Kharkiv born photographer to realize the artistic task he had set himself for several years - to associate in a single photographic work the intimate with the public. "During the events of the Maidan I had strong feelings. I wanted to make such a work, where there is not only Maidan or AntiMaidan, but a coherent representation of what it is to be a part if it."
When his hard drive broke down, Igor Chekachkov lost ten years of work, including reportage, artistic and personal photography.

I Give You My Face Portrait by Tihomir Stoyanov | Imaginary Archive

'I Give You My Face Portrait' project takes us back to a forgotten tradition of giving each other photos with messages. In today’s digital world, these precious memories that people used to keep in their wallets prove unnecessary. This project includes 24 portraits which Tihomir Stoyanov selected among hundreds of similar photos found at the flea market. These photos were taken in the period between 1930 and 1991.
I Give You My Face Portrait Project takes us back to a forgotten tradition of giving each other photos with messages.

YatFTIL by Svitlana Levchenko

'In my childhood, I often heard you are not beautiful, you are pretty’ says Odessa-born Svitlana Levchenko and continues ‘I grew up with this knowledge and it became an indisputable axiom.’
In most cultures today, women are defined by their external beauty and the perception of female identity is being continuously distorted by a complex set of traditions, expectations, stereotypes and taboos. As women, we perceive how we’re being perceived and subconsciously impose outside limitations on our bodies and inner selves. In her recent work YatFTIL (You Are The Fear That I Lost) Odesssa-born Svitlana Levchenko looks deeper into these self-imposed prisons we create for ourselves through a series of visual metaphors and self-portraits.

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